inks & things

inks & things

Inking tip: remove brush pen cartridge  for more control & nice drybrush effect.

Inking tip: remove brush pen cartridge for more control & nice drybrush effect.

“What makes a good story and how has outstanding of that changed over time?” Is a question raised in a recent article in The Verge by Veronique Greenwood, and one that got me thinking.
We are living in a era that is increasingly being defined by a succession of new technologies used for social interaction. It can be difficult to separate what is in a story from how it is conveyed because; 
We’re in the thick of things here and it’s hard to get a good perspective on history as it is unfolding.
The form of a story plays a role in how it is told. Think, reading a play instead of watching one.
The form a story takes, more specifically, the way that it is communicated is one that I find interesting when it is compared to the older tales of humanity. For example: The Illiad vs Snowfall. Will this New York Times article sink its hooks into our collective subconscious because the technological delivery mechanism is so relevant and attractive to our tastes? Snowfall is still being referenced over two years after it debuted, which are like dog years in internet time. Will it live on after the environment it was created in is no longer accessible or will the eventual technological obsolescence scrub it from history? 
It won’t take a long time to find out. Remember Flash? If you work in the interactive community, you probably do. At one point it was the dominant technological form of communication. I got married way back in the early aughts, and I created a interactive CD (using Flash, of course) as part of our wedding invites. I can’t find a computer old enough that can play it. We have the paper invites, we have film from the wedding it self, but I may never find a good way to share the little experience I built for our guests with our daughter.
Will the things we make be held hostage by the technologies we built them in, or will their be a way to transcend technology? The Illiad has. Look at this timeline:
12th century BC Trojan War.
7-8th century BC Homer composed the Illiad as a poem that is spread in the oral tradition.
The work continued being of great importance throughout the Classical Greek, Hellinistic and Byzantine periods.
10th century AD oldest known manuscript.
1473 reprinted in the English book, “Recuyell of the Historyes of Troye and widely circulated in Europe in Latin translations.
1602 William Shakespeare bases Troilus and Cressida off of the Illiad.
1791 William Cowper prefaces his translation with, “I have omitted nothing; I have invented nothing.”
1870 William Cullent Bryant publishes a blank verse version.
20th century sees several re-publishings and the inclusion in many school curriculums.
2004 Troy, the movie.
This leads me to postulate that technology is just the shell that holds a story for a time, before a new shell can be used. A compelling story should live as long as people are interested in hearing it. I hope.
A few questions to leave you with:
Are we in a new golden age of myth and folklore? 
Will that great story told in Flash have a life 10 years from now? Or will the message be stripped from the medium, leaving only stories behind.
What will be the next Beowulf? 
Who will be the next Brothers Grimm?  
What can we do to create content, or spread ideas that have universal appeal and longevity?

What makes a good story and how has outstanding of that changed over time?” Is a question raised in a recent article in The Verge by Veronique Greenwood, and one that got me thinking.

We are living in a era that is increasingly being defined by a succession of new technologies used for social interaction. It can be difficult to separate what is in a story from how it is conveyed because; 

  1. We’re in the thick of things here and it’s hard to get a good perspective on history as it is unfolding.
  2. The form of a story plays a role in how it is told. Think, reading a play instead of watching one.

The form a story takes, more specifically, the way that it is communicated is one that I find interesting when it is compared to the older tales of humanity. For example: The Illiad vs Snowfall. Will this New York Times article sink its hooks into our collective subconscious because the technological delivery mechanism is so relevant and attractive to our tastes? Snowfall is still being referenced over two years after it debuted, which are like dog years in internet time. Will it live on after the environment it was created in is no longer accessible or will the eventual technological obsolescence scrub it from history? 

It won’t take a long time to find out. Remember Flash? If you work in the interactive community, you probably do. At one point it was the dominant technological form of communication. I got married way back in the early aughts, and I created a interactive CD (using Flash, of course) as part of our wedding invites. I can’t find a computer old enough that can play it. We have the paper invites, we have film from the wedding it self, but I may never find a good way to share the little experience I built for our guests with our daughter.

Will the things we make be held hostage by the technologies we built them in, or will their be a way to transcend technology? The Illiad has. Look at this timeline:

12th century BC Trojan War.

7-8th century BC Homer composed the Illiad as a poem that is spread in the oral tradition.

The work continued being of great importance throughout the Classical Greek, Hellinistic and Byzantine periods.

10th century AD oldest known manuscript.

1473 reprinted in the English book, “Recuyell of the Historyes of Troye and widely circulated in Europe in Latin translations.

1602 William Shakespeare bases Troilus and Cressida off of the Illiad.

1791 William Cowper prefaces his translation with, “I have omitted nothing; I have invented nothing.”

1870 William Cullent Bryant publishes a blank verse version.

20th century sees several re-publishings and the inclusion in many school curriculums.

2004 Troy, the movie.

This leads me to postulate that technology is just the shell that holds a story for a time, before a new shell can be used. A compelling story should live as long as people are interested in hearing it. I hope.

A few questions to leave you with:

  • Are we in a new golden age of myth and folklore? 
  • Will that great story told in Flash have a life 10 years from now? Or will the message be stripped from the medium, leaving only stories behind.
  • What will be the next Beowulf? 
  • Who will be the next Brothers Grimm?  
  • What can we do to create content, or spread ideas that have universal appeal and longevity?
New illustration work and prints up on Fantom Forest
New site devoted entirely to the new book. Photos, drawings, process, video. Check it out at SaltFireFallDust.com

New site devoted entirely to the new book. Photos, drawings, process, video. Check it out at SaltFireFallDust.com

If you like my illustrated map appearing around #icon8pdx check out the book it’s in: http://t.co/PvfFdIHDB8 http://t.co/i0pHKT9fX4

If you like my illustrated map appearing around #icon8pdx check out the book it’s in: http://t.co/PvfFdIHDB8 http://t.co/i0pHKT9fX4

I’ll be at the ICON8 Roadshow tonight at the Portland Art Museum from 7-10PM. It’s free to all and will be chock-full of great work. 
I’ll have a new print, postcards, books and give aways. Stop by to say hello!

I’ll be at the ICON8 Roadshow tonight at the Portland Art Museum from 7-10PM. It’s free to all and will be chock-full of great work. 

I’ll have a new print, postcards, books and give aways. Stop by to say hello!

"Wishing you a sunny day from rain-town." A new limited edition print letterpressed by the sublime KeeganMeegan. The registration and color fidelity is just amazing, I had to take a detail shot. 

These will be on sale at the ICON roadshow TODAY! at the Portland Art Museum from 7-10PM. Remainders will go up on Fantom Forest next week.

New postcards for ICON8 - hit me up at the show or message me an address and I’ll pop one in the mail with a few other things.

New postcards for ICON8 - hit me up at the show or message me an address and I’ll pop one in the mail with a few other things.

I made a whole bunch of mini-cards of the book for ICON - hit me up if you want one. 

I made a whole bunch of mini-cards of the book for ICON - hit me up if you want one.